Pituitary Innovation and Teaching

Vision-related symptoms

What are some ways that a pituitary tumour may affect my vision?

A pituitary tumour pressing against the nerves of the eyes may affect peripheral (side) vision. This may lead to problems with seeing objects on either side of you.
Figure 6: A pituitary tumour pressing against the nerves of the eyes may affect peripheral (side) vision
How a tumour affects vision depends on the size of the tumour and how quickly it has grown. As the tumour grows, it presses on the nerves that allow one to see. The most common symptoms are:
  • dim or dark vision
  • blurred vision
  • changes in how you see colour
  • problems with seeing objects on either side of you (see Figure 6)
  • complete loss of vision in one or both eyes
  • double vision or droopy eyelid(s)

These symptoms usually happen slowly over time and often are not noticed until they are quite advanced.  Sometimes, patients only notice problems with their vision if they happen to cover one eye and realize that they cannot see well out of the other eye. Rarely, the symptoms may happen all at once.

This is why people with pituitary tumours will see an eye specialist, called an ophthalmologist or neuro-ophthalmologist.

 

Page last updated: November 22, 2016