Newsroom

St. Michael's in the news

2014

Aug. 19

Ebola outbreak: Africans understandably wary about promised cures
Column by Dr. Jim Lavery
CBC News

New concerns that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is much worse than reported are adding to the global pressure to find a solution – even if that means testing unproven drugs on desperate Africans.

Not satisfied after a meal? Here’s something that could help
Column by Dr. John Sievenpiper
The Globe and Mail

Not satisfied after a meal? Add beans. If you feel like you need to eat a snack after finishing a meal, consider adding beans (or lentils) to your main course next time.

Aug. 15

Adrenaline shots may not help people survive cardiac arrest
Column by Dr. Steve Lin
Popular Science

An upcoming study in the U.K. will inject dying patients with placebo instead, which raises some obvious ethical concerns.

Aug. 13

Ebola drugs and ethics: When need dictates action
Column by Dr. Jim Lavery
The Globe and Mail

When it came to light that Mapp Biopharmaceuticals Inc. of San Diego had a product in development that was designed to hold the Ebola virus in check and limit its destructive activity, it upset the consistent storyline for dozens of Ebola outbreaks since its discovery in the 1970s: Up to 90 per cent of those infected die, there are no treatments or vaccines, and little cause for hope.

Palliative care for the homeless
Interview with Dr. Naheed Dosani
Global Morning Show

The Toronto doctor talks about palliative care for the homeless.

The success of the 2014 Urban Angel Golf Classic
Comments by Dr. Robert Howard
Global News

Highlights from the big event at Angus Glen Golf Club in Markham, Ontario.

The ethics of using untested Ebola drugs in Africa
Comments by Dr. Jim Lavery
The Huffington Post

Out of sight, out of mind. That about sums up Canadians' attitudes towards the Ebola virus.

Aug. 12

Remember SARS lessons during Ebola scare: Doc
Comments by Dr. Kamran Khan
The Toronto Sun

A Toronto doctor says that while the chances of an Ebola outbreak in Canada are low, the painful lessons learned from the 2003 SARS epidemic shouldn’t be forgotten.

Eating one serving of 'pulses' every day could lead to better weight loss
Research by Dr. John Sievenpiper
The Huffington Post

Eating about one serving a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils can increase fullness, which may lead to better weight management and weight loss, a new study from a University of Toronto expert has found.

Aug. 11

Ebola outbreak deemed a global health emergency by WHO
Comments by Dr. Kamran Khan
CBC News

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is an international public health emergency that demands an extraordinary response, the World Health Organization declared Friday.

Aug. 8

Palliative care doctors working to aid homeless
Comments by Dr. Naheed Dosani
Radio Canada International

The homeless–like death–are a fact of life in Canada. These are the people who slipped through the cracks. Sometimes it was their fault. Sometimes not.

Aug. 7

WHO asks: Is use of experimental Ebola drugs ethical?
Comments by Dr. Kamran Khan
CTV News

The World Health Organization will convene a panel of medical ethicists to debate the use of experimental drugs in the midst of a deadly Ebola outbreak.

Aug. 5

Palliative care program helps homeless in their final days
Comments by Dr. Naheed Dosani
The Toronto Star

They’re too often the forgotten people — or the ones many of us turn a blind eye to as we pass a street corner where they might implore us for extra change: the homeless living rough outside through all kinds of weather or those precariously housed in a cot-for-the-night shelter or a decaying rooming house.

Aug. 1

What you need to know about prescription painkillers
Research by Tara Gomes
Global News

The number of people dying from prescription painkillers has increased dramatically in the past two decades.

Tree nuts cut diabetes risk
Research by Dr. John Sievenpiper
Shape

We already know that nuts are a healthy addition to a diet: They contain protein, fiber, a variety of vitamins and minerals, and cholesterol lowering properties. But new research shows they may also pack some other serious benefits when it comes to diabetes.

July 31

How nuts might help diabetics
Research by Dr. John Sievenpiper
Yahoo News

This is good news for anyone with Type 2 diabetes. Eating two servings of tree nuts a day appears to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels in people with the disease.

Why 'tree nuts' are good for your health revealed
Research by Dr. John Sievenpiper
Yahoo News

A new study has revealed that eating tree nuts can help in reducing two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome that could lead to life threatening problems such as strokes and heart diseases.

July 30

Go nuts: Eating more is good for you
Research by Dr. John Sievenpiper
The Huffington Post

I used to regularly visit a nut shop downtown run by a lively old lady whose claim to health and longevity was that she snacked on the nuts she sold all day long.

July 23

Study traces risk factor for heart disease in women
Comments by Dr. Beth Abranson
CTV News

Canadian researchers say they’ve shed new light on a “genetic basis” for higher blood pressure in women -- something that could help identify which women are at greater risk for heart disease later in life.

July 22

If you have tattoos, piercings or a pacemaker, speak up before an MRI
Comments by Dr. Anish Kirpalani
CTV News

We humans are made of flesh and bone, of cartilage, sinews, muscles and tendons. But a surprising number of us carry around embedded metal as well.

July 18

Screening rates stagnant
Research by Dr. Tara Kiran
CTV News

A program designed to incentivize doctors for promoting cancer screenings doesn't seem to be making a difference.

Testosterone: the latest recreational drug?
Research by Tara Gomes
The Globe and Mail

Here we go again. Another cure-all drug, this time testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), is shown to have potentially life-threatening side effects, including heart attack or stroke, according to a recent report by Health Canada.

July 15

Testosterone replacement therapy use in Ontario soars over 15 years
Research by Tara Gomes
The Globe and Mail

Testosterone replacement therapy use has increased by 310 per cent in Ontario over 15 years, despite the fact only 6.3 per cent of men newly starting the treatment were actually diagnosed with a condition that would require TRT, a new report concludes.

Good news, bad news
Research by Dr. Tara Kiran
Maclean's

Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto confirmed what had been suspected for years: a program which gave doctors bonuses for raising rates of cancer screening accomplished nothing.

PTSD could explain some post-concussion symptoms
Research by Dr. Jane Topolovec-Vranic
CBC News

Some concussion symptoms that last three months after a head injury may be related to post-traumatic stress disorder, a new study suggests.

July 15

Bonus program didn't boost cancer screening rate in Ontario
Research by Dr. Tara Kiran
CBC News

An incentive program that pays Ontario doctors extra for persuading patients to get screened for certain cancers shelled out $110 million over three years — but it did not result in significant increases in the number of people going for the tests, a new study reveals.

Black box watches surgeons
Research by Dr. Teodor Grantcharov
CBC News

Technology used to track airplanes placed in an operating room.

July 11

Aboriginal health study a call to action
Research by Dr. Michelle Firestone
The Hamilton Spectator

A new study that shines a harsh spotlight on the health of Hamilton's urban native community has something in common with The Spectator's Code Red research.

Push on to get dentists to stop routinely prescribing potentially deadly opioids
Research by Tara Gomes
Ottawa Citizen

At a time when death rates from opioids are raising alarms, dentists are being told to stop routinely prescribing painkillers such as OxyContin to patients who have had their wisdom teeth removed or other dental surgery.

July 10

Poverty and chronic disease plaguing Hamilton’s aboriginal population
Research by Dr. Michelle Firestone
The Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton's urban aboriginal population faces striking poverty, a disproportionately high rate of chronic diseases and more frequent visits to hospitals' emergency departments, a new study says.

Police say city’s abuse of prescription drugs mirrors province’s
Research by Tara Gomes
The Whig Standard

A recent Toronto-based study shows that one in eight deaths in young adults in Ontario is caused by overdoses of prescription medication such as Oxycontin. In Kingston, police say it’s no different.

More walkable neighbourhoods can reduce risk of diabetes: study
Research by Dr. Gillian Booth
Global News

Walkable neighbourhoods motivate people to move – and it lowers their risk of diabetes, according to new research.

Hospital pilot testing OR box
Research by Dr. Teodor Grantcharov
CTV News - Canada AM

Dr. Grantcharov, one of the doctors spearheading the development on where the idea came from and what impact it might have on medical care.

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