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New glucose meters going network-wide

Accuracy saves lives: How this new technology is making a difference

Toronto, January 2, 2019

By Michael Oliveira

Liivi Pormeister shows off the new Nova StatStrip glucose meter while Daniel Beriault holds the older meter that's being replaced.
Liivi Pormeister shows off the new Nova StatStrip glucose meter while Daniel Beriault holds the older meter that's being replaced.

The rollout of new glucose meters this month at St. Michael’s is a win, win, win, says medical technical specialist Liivi Pormeister.

The Nova StatStrip meters are much easier for nurses to use, patients can count on getting more reliable test results, and it’s an example of a network-wide approach to embracing a new technology, says Pormeister.

“We’d get complaints from nurses trying to scan their badge like 20 times,” Pormeister says of the frustrations with the older glucose meters, “and if you have inaccurate glucose results from your meters then your insulin dosing will be off as well.

“This is a benefit all around, for the operators, for the patients, everybody.”

To help with training and preparation for the rollout, Pormeister visited St. Joseph’s - which began using the meters late last year - and got advice on implementation from point-of-care technical specialist Sarah Kim.

“It’s helping a lot with our implementation, so it wasn’t completely new when we saw it here for the first time. Sarah gave me a lot of tips on things that helped when she was implementing,” Pormeister says.

In addition to ease of use, the Nova StatStrip is the only glucose meter approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for critically ill patients, notes Daniel Beriault, head of St. Michael’s division of biochemistry.

“As a trauma and acute care hospital we have a lot of critically ill patients so that’s incredibly important to us,” says Beriault.

“In the last several years a high number of adverse patient events have been traced to the use of less accurate glucose meters in hospitals in the U.S. This meter will provide the highest level of accuracy for all our patients.”

The glucose meters are expected to go in service mid-month at St. Michael’s and in the new year at Providence.

About St. Michael's Hospital

St. Michael’s Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 29 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, care of the homeless and global health are among the Hospital’s recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre, which make up the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research and education at St. Michael’s Hospital are recognized and make an impact around the world. Founded in 1892, the hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

About Unity Health Toronto

Unity Health Toronto, comprised of Providence Healthcare, St. Joseph’s Health Centre and St. Michael’s Hospital, works to advance the health of everyone in our urban communities and beyond. Our health network serves patients, residents and clients across the full spectrum of care, spanning primary care, secondary community care, tertiary and quaternary care services to post-acute through rehabilitation, palliative care and long-term care, while investing in world-class research and education. For more information, visit www.unityhealth.to.


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