Newsroom

Our Stories

Improving training and efficiency key for new training and simulation room

Toronto, December 4, 2014

By Greg Winson

Valter Silva cleans the floor
Valter Silva, a facility housekeeper, cleans the floor of the Environmental Services training and simulation room during a training exercise. (Photo by Katie Cooper)

Health care professionals use patient simulators to get hands-on experience to respond to critical situations in a controlled environment. Now, Environmental Services has its own training and simulation patient room to ensure best practices in cleaning are being practiced every day.

“We have more than 280 staff members that need training,” said Justin Carrozza, a supervisor of inpatient and critical care units in Environmental Services. “Before we created this room, staff were trained in patient rooms if they could find a vacant one.”

As many as 150 hours a year were lost finding an appropriate room to use for training.

The mock patient room, located in B1 Shuter Wing, has a patient bed, windows, lockers, toilet and sink. The room also features the three types of flooring – terrazzo, vinyl and linoleum – found throughout the hospital. The same cleaning solution is used on all flooring, but the time required to properly clean each type of floor varies.

And just like the Allan Waters Simulation Centre, the EVS simulation and training room isn’t just for new staff.

“We will use this room to retrain existing staff as well,” said Douglas Johnson, a supervisor in outpatient, core areas and off-sites in Environmental Services.


More than 200,000 patients acquire infections while receiving health care in Canada each year. (Public Health Agency of Canada)

Studies have shown that improved training of Environmental Services staff can have a significant impact on hospital-acquired infection rates, patient safety and patient satisfaction.

In addition to the training and simulation room, a new training video is being produced to complement a series of in class and online training modules. These initiatives are being led by Carrozza, Johnson, Tony Nguyen and Michael Camara of Environmental Services.

About St. Michael's Hospital

St. Michael’s Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in 27 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, care of the homeless and global health are among the hospital’s recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre, which make up the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research and education at St. Michael's Hospital are recognized and make an impact around the world. Founded in 1892, the hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.