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TIPSY scholarship competition encourages high school students to reflect

Toronto, January 9, 2013

By Navindra Budhram

TIPSY Coordinator Julie Mauceri demonstrates trauma resuscitation skills to a high school student in the Allan Waters Family Simulation Centre. Photo by Anne Sorvari.
TIPSY Coordinator Julie Mauceri demonstrates trauma resuscitation skills to a high school student in the Allan Waters Family Simulation Centre. Photo by Anne Sorvari.

High school students across the GTA who take part in the hospital’s ThinkFirst Injury Prevention Program will now have a chance to win a $1,000 scholarship by using multimedia to convey their prevention message.

The program, known as TIPSY, is a half-day injury prevention session offered by St. Michael’s to Grade 11 and 12 students between the ages of 16 and 19.

“TIPSY offers value for students,” said Julie Mauceri, the program co-ordinator and a clinical nurse educator at St. Michael’s. “I always begin the day announcing to the class that this will be the best field trip they will ever attend. The scholarship is a win-win situation. How great is it that students will be able to showcase their learnings while at the same time adding $1,000 to their pockets?”

The TIPSY Scholarship Competition, a first for the program, gives participating students a chance to win a $1,000 scholarship provided by Howie, Sacks & Henry LLP, a law firm that has sponsored the program since 2009.

To win, students must submit a video, blog, essay or some other piece of content to smhtipsy.weebly.com that shows the key messages they’ve taken away from the program.

For students, TIPSY makes all the difference in bringing injury prevention to the forefront with students.

“Teens don’t necessarily have the experience to fully understand the impact of making poor decisions, like drug abuse or reckless driving,” said Fatimah Yassime, a Grade 12 student from Central Technical who participated in a TIPSY Tour this fall. “When they actually see it in front of them, whether in person or on a screen, and listen to speakers who have experienced and survived those ordeals, it makes all the difference.”

TIPSY is taught by an inter-professional team of critical care and emergency room nurses and representatives from Toronto Police Services, MADD, Safe and Sober Canada, Voice of Injury Prevention and the simulation centre.

“Having a diverse team of speakers, including those who are trying to prevent injuries and those who have been affected by injuries, helps to provide a balanced perspective for the students,” said Elizabeth Butorac, clinical leader manager for the TNICU. “Taking them to the trauma areas allows them see the consequences of poor decision-making first hand.”

The contest will run until May 31. The winner or winners will be announced in June.