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Acute kidney injury patients more likely to need dialysis within five years: study

Patients who sustain injury to their kidneys and require in-hospital dialysis are three times more likely to need long-term dialysis later in life compared to those without a history of this condition, says a new study from St. Michael’s Hospital.

Toronto, September 15, 2009

Kidney Dialysis

Patients who sustain injury to their kidneys and require in-hospital dialysis are three times more likely to need long-term dialysis later in life compared to those without a history of this condition, says a new study from St. Michael’s Hospital. Patients with acute kidney disease are a high-risk group for whom early medical surveillance and intervention may prevent progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease.

Approximately two million Canadians have kidney disease and more than 20,000 of these individuals receive ongoing chronic dialysis, according to the Kidney Foundation of Canada.

The study, published in the September 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), is the largest study to date to look at the long-term health implications for patients who have experienced acute kidney injury.

“Now that we understand that having acute kidney injury multiplies the risk of future kidney complications, we as physicians can increase the monitoring of these patients and address complications as they occur. If we do this, we may be able to prevent these patients from needing chronic dialysis,” said Dr. Ron Wald, the study’s lead investigator.

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